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Addictions
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What is Addiction?What Causes Addiction?How Do You Get Addicted?Signs and Symptoms of AddictionTreatment for Addiction
Treatment for AddictionNatural Recovery: Recovery from Addiction Without TreatmentNatural Recovery ContinuedChoosing An Effective Treatment Approach: Evidenced-Based PracticesWhat Makes An Addictions Treatment Effective? Biological Approaches to Addiction Treatment: MedicationsThe Role of Medication in Addictions TreatmentPharmacologic Medications for Addictions TreatmentPharmacologic Medications for Addictions Treatment: Part IIPsychological Approaches to Addiction TreatmentMotivation for Change: The Stages of Change ModelMotivation for Change ContinuedTypes of Evidenced-Based (Effective) Treatments for Addiction: Motivational InterviewingRelapse Prevention TherapyContingency ManagementCognitive-Behavioral TherapyDialectical Behavioral TherapyAcceptance and Commitment TherapyWhat The Pros Know: The Practical Recovery ModelSocial Approaches Addictions RecoveryA Cultural Approach to Addictions Treatment: Harm ReductionFamily Approaches to Addictions Treatment: CRAFT, Intervention And Al-AnonThe Social Support Approach to Addictions Recovery: Recovery Support Groups Self-Empowering Support Groups for Addiction Recovery: Smart RecoveryModeration ManagementWomen for SobrietyLifeRing Secular Recovery and Secular Organizations for Sobriety (SOS)Summary of Self-Empowering Support GroupsSpiritual Approaches to Addiction Recovery12-Step Support Groups: Groups That End With "Anonymous"12-Step Support Groups: Part II12-Step Support Groups: Part IIIExpanding Addiction Treatment Choices in the United StatesDeveloping a Personal Action Plan for Addiction Recovery: Part IDeveloping a Personal Action Plan for Addiction Recovery: Part II
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Dialectical Behavioral Therapy

A. Tom Horvath, Ph.D., ABPP, Kaushik Misra, Ph.D., Amy K. Epner, Ph.D., and Galen Morgan Cooper, Ph.D. , edited by C. E. Zupanick, Psy.D.

Dialectical Behavioral Therapy (DBT) is a hybrid form of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT). Like CBT, Dialectical Behavioral Therapy an evidence-based practice.

Marsha Linehan, Ph.D. (Linehan, 1993) developed DBT. Linehan noticed that some of her therapy participants were highly reactive to the change emphasis of CBT. Their sensitivity to requests for change made it difficult for them to benefit from CBT. Linehan concluded that the change emphasis of CBT was profoundly invalidating to certain highly sensitive patients. Therefore, Linehan added an acceptance component to her treatment approach. She began to encourage therapy participants to both accept themselves, and to change their behavior. DBT is "dialectical" because acceptance and change are seemingly incompatible agendas. However, it is clear that some therapy participants can only begin to change once they truly accept themselves and their current situation. To promote such acceptance, DBT teaches mindfulness. Mindfulness refers to the non-judgmental observation of moment-to-moment awareness. Mindfulness techniques borrow heavily from Eastern meditative practices. Research suggests that DBT may be particularly effective in addiction treatment for individuals with borderline personality disorders.